jeffzeller

jeffzeller

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jeffzeller
On February 22, 2016, jz commented on Black Twitter: the next online advertising play? :

Great points! Totally agree that there is a ton of consumer power built into interactions that happen on Twitter. Social media can be a powerful, yet dangerous, tool if used disingenuously. People jumping on the hype cycle = bad. Twitter is in an interesting spot these days, and I think it would be well served to figure out the elements that caused Black Twitter to emerge and remain popular in the first place, and then embrace those elements. Because it is clearly having a hard time retaining users that don’t feel a part of some Twitter community, yet I would venture to guess retention among users that identify as a part of the Black Twitter community would be much lower.

jeffzeller
On February 22, 2016, jz commented on Music, Man and Machine :

What fascinates me about Spotify playlists is that it used to be individual users that would create these playlists and many other users would subscribe to them since it was easier to find “popular playlists” when browsing the app. Now, Spotify has decided THEY want editorial control of the non-algorithm playlists, and THOSE are the ones that are promoted on the Browse page etc. Which makes it almost impossible for a no-name person to become an “influencer” on the platform itself. Quite different than how things started out. Wonder if people promoting their playlists from outside of Spotify will continue to happen if they can’t get the same reach they can by building a large Instagram following, for example.

jeffzeller
On February 22, 2016, jz commented on Google vs. IBETCHA :

Quality work, eriq. Does Larry Page have a copy of iBetcha?

jeffzeller

Wow, very interesting pieces that you have put together! I definitely agree that more and more people value this design aesthetic. When unfinished products are shipped to the US, are they going to specialty stores or directly to consumers? Does the direct-to-consumer model work here? I assume that the consumer would be responsible for “finishing” the product, which I suspect takes a moderate to high level of skill.
My second question is around the specifics of Russia. Does a weak Ruble and relatively cheap labor give them automatic comparative advantage in this field? Why wouldn’t US craftsmen be able to capitalize on this increasing interest in custom home furniture? Would like to know more about the business model of paying for locally sourced goods vs. products shipped from the other side of the world that still need to be made into a finished state in the US. In this sense, are you simply inserting yourself as a middleman?
Good luck with the start up, I hope that it continues to grow!